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Abstract

In this paper a scaling approach for the solution of 2D FE models of electric machines is proposed. This allows a geometrical and stator and rotor resistance scaling as well as a rewinding of a squirrel cage induction machine enabling an efficient numerical optimization. The 2D FEM solutions of a reference machine are calculated by a model based hybrid numeric induction machine simulation approach. In contrast to already known scaling procedures for synchronous machines the FEM solutions of the induction machine are scaled in the stator-current-rotor-frequency-plane and then transformed to the torque- speed-map. This gives the possibility to use a new time scaling factor that is necessary to keep a constant field distribution. The scaling procedure is validated by the finite element method and used in a numerical optimization process for the sizing of an electric vehicle traction drive considering the gear ratio. The results show that the scaling procedure is very accurate, computational very efficient and suitable for the use in machine design optimization.
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Abstract

Long transmission lines have to be compensated to enhance the transport of active power. But a wrong design of the compensation may lead to subsynchronous resonances (SSR). For studies often park equivalent circuits are used. The parameters of the models are often determined analytically or by a three-phase short-circuit test. Models with this parameters give good results for frequencies of 50 Hz and 100 Hz resp. 60 Hz and 120 Hz. But SSR occurs at lower frequencies what arises the question of the reliability of the used models. Therefore in this publication a novel method for the determination of Park equivalent circuit parameters is presented. Herein the parameters are determined form time functions of the currents and the electromagnetic moment of the machine calculated by transient finite-element simulations. This parameters are used for network simulations and compared with the finite-element calculations. Compared to the parameters derived by a three-phase short-circuit a significant better accuracy of simulation results can be achieved by the presented method.
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